Continuous Testing, Service Virtualization & Beer Tasting

Posted on Aug 27, 2015

Dev-Hops-Podcast-LogoParasoft's business partner Skytap recently invited Wayne Ariola (Parasoft Chief Strategy Officer) to be a guest on their DevHops podcast. With Skytap's Noel Wurst moderating, Wayne and Skytap's Jason English chatted about continuous testing, service virtualization, and how SDLC acceleration is impacting quality—all while sipping and reviewing three beers of their choice.

Listen to the 30-minute podcast to hear about:

  • How quality and speed are no longer in a "host/parasite" relationship

  • What's being overlooked in the user-story focused testing common with Agile

  • What the business really gets out of continuous testing

  • The myth that continuous testing = more testing or more automation

  • How the demand for SDLC acceleration is impacting qualityDevHopsContinuousTesting

  • How to convince teams to take the "leap of faith" needed to trust simulations

  • The beer reviews: Abita's Wrought Iron IPA, Beck's Beer, and Georgetown Brewing's Manny's Pale Ale  

 

Be sure to visit Skytap's blog if you'd like a complete transcript of this week's show, or if you'd like to check out previous DevHops episodes, such as Will Virtualization Beat Physical Reality, Tales from the Journey to DevOps, or How to Test for Enterprise Mobility.

 

Continuous Testing Book

ContinuousTestingWant to learn how to establish a continuous testing process that helps you accelerate delivery while minimizing business risk? Read Parasoft's 44-page Continuous Testing eBook today to learn how to get started. Print copies are available at Amazon

From Alan Zeichick, SD Times

"Ariola and Dunlop nail the target: It’s all about risk. That’s what insurance is all about, that’s what attorneys are all about, that’s the sort of decision that every business and technology manager makes all day, every day. We have to live with risk and make tradeoffs. More testing? At some point, indeed, we have to cut it off.

It’s difficult if not impossible to assess the business risk of software quality. Yes, software quality is expensive. The higher the quality, the more time it takes to deliver software, and the greater the resources you must spend on software quality. And yes, it is expensive to have software failures—you might lose money, lose customers, suffer lawsuits, damage your brand, end up on the front page of The Wall Street Journal. Not good...

Ariola and Dunlop make a good point in their short book: We mustn’t accept that the trend toward accelerating the development process will magically improve software quality; indeed, we should expect the opposite. And if we are going to mitigate risk in today’s environment, we need to reengineer the software development process in a way that considers business risk to be one of the metrics, along with the other traditional results of our automated testing and Continuous Integration systems."
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